Frankie Rose, Widowspeak, Talk Normal, Blues Control, Amen Dunes, Noveller with WNYU DJs

WNYU Presents CMJ:

Frankie Rose, Widowspeak, Talk Normal, Blues Control, Amen Dunes, Noveller with WNYU DJs

WNYU DJs

Thu, October 20, 2011

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$8.00 - $10.00

This event is 18 and over

FREE WITH CMJ BADGE

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Frankie Rose
Frankie Rose
As a founding member of the Vivian Girls, and a drummer/vocalist in both Crystal Stilts and Dum Dum Girls, Frankie Rose has been an integral part of Brooklyn’s still vital music scene for years. Her highly anticipated solo project not only reflects the aesthetic earmarks of her musical past, but reveals her as a fully-formed artist in her own right.

Haunted by the ghosts of Brill Building, and equal measures of 80s and 90s pop, Frankie’s music evokes a spooky, lovely charm. Her ethereal, yet affectation-free vocal melodies, swirling in a sea of church-like harmonies over a bed of tambourines, bells, and propulsive drumming, recall such artists as Eilzabeth Fraser and Black Tambourine. It is both timeless and immediate; deeply personal and completely universal.

Ms. Rose’s self-debut titled debut, which hit the streets in July of 2010, is moody and subtle dream pop, as if Cocteau Twins and Spacemen 3 tracked a split LP with some help from Phil Spector. The record receive much acclaim, making it onto Rough Trade’s top 100 of the year. Cited by Pitchfork as “lean, elegant music that practically glows in the face of exceptional fuss,” and named one of New York Times Style Magazine’s “Ones to Watch,” Frankie Rose is truly a force to be reckoned with.
Widowspeak
Widowspeak
To say that Widowspeak is a Northwest band is to tell a half-truth. After all they formed in a Brooklyn apartment thousands of miles to the east, and their guitarist has never even seen the Pacific Ocean. There are aspects of the band’s sound—abrasive guitar hooks, immediate drumming, and incessant codas—that speak to living in a big city. But there’s also a dreary sparseness, a David Lynch-esque darkness, culled from the other members’ native Washington.

Singer/songwriter Molly Hamilton grew up in an old house in Tacoma, drummer Michael Stasiak in nearby Lakewood. While grunge put Seattle on the map and Riot Grrl and the DIY aesthetic are synonymous with Olympia, Tacoma remains grittier, darker even. Infamous for the acrid smell of its paper mills, this blue-collar city somehow fosters a fertile music community—if few outsiders know about it. Michael and Molly first crossed paths in that tight-knit scene, both contributing to a local compilation label. The label lasted all of one summer before half its roster decamped for New York.

There, three summers later, Michael approached Molly about starting a new band. Molly’s crippling stage fright and inexperience with the electric guitar seemed good excuses to decline, but at Michael’s urging she bought a used Danelectro and put pen to paper. Soon after, Michael invited guitarist Robert Earl Thomas to a tentative first practice. Though Robert had to plug his guitar into the stereo, and Michael played only two drums, something was palpable in that first hour. They chose a name Molly had picked months before, and Widowspeak was born.

The band’s skeletal sound began to take shape, with Robert’s rust-belt guitar parts lending a restless, sinister edge to Molly’s subdued melodies and soft vocal style. Writing became a collaborative effort, and Widowspeak racked up an arsenal of songs. By fall the trio had recorded a six-track cassette using only a built-in laptop microphone and Garageband. The self-released October Tape, as it was called, fell into the hands of Brooklyn’s Captured Tracks. Weeks later, after only their sixth show, Widowspeak recorded the 7” single, “Harsh Realm,” in anticipation of a full LP.

That album, recorded at Rear House with Jarvis Taveniere of Woods, documents Widowspeak’s inaugural year. In a relaxed studio setting songs born from those first jittery practices could breathe. The trio expanded their modest instrumentation while retaining a sparse aesthetic. The resulting record offers an eerie ambience, at times channeling 1950’s jukebox pop, at others, 1960’s psychedelia. While garnering comparisons to slow-moving 1990’s acts such as Mazzy Star or Cat Power, Widowspeak have defined a sound that’s earnestly nostalgic, and increasingly confident. Even so, these are songs about heartache. They are songs about homesickness, about longing for pine forests, reckless youth, and dark nights in strange cities.
Talk Normal
Talk Normal
Sarah Register and Andrya Ambro allied as TALK NORMAL in 2007, after years of friendship, and haven't stopped moving. Since their lightning-strike first appearance, TALK NORMAL's sound has stormed upward and outward, referencing few and relating to many, a jarringly songful gale of rhythm and noise supporting pleas and plaints, signal-calls and marching orders. Each show builds on past ones: up-to-the-moment updates of ideas previously stated, new phrasings of old upheavals delivered with increasing focus and joy. Darkness and light; fury, silence, space and sound.

TALK NORMAL is part of a long lineage of musicians who took their tools and ideas outside of the existing comfort zone and created a new one - DNA, Laurie Anderson, Sonic Youth, The Creatures, Public Image Ltd., Cocteau Twins - regardless of whether your ears perceive their presence or influence here. And after a couple of years having done-it-themselves - including self-released demos, the 2008 EP Secret Cog, and shows played alongside Marnie Stern, Major Stars, Boss Hog and Magik Markers, to name just a few - TALK NORMAL is releasing their debut album, Sugarland, on Rare Book Room Records. Recorded with Nicolas Vernhes and featuring guest spots from Sightings bassist Richard Hoffman (who sometimes joins TALK NORMAL onstage), Sugarland comprises nine original songs and a cover of Roxy Music's “In Every Dream Home a Heartache.” In every way, Sugarland represents a startling surge forward for the band - the clearest, loudest expression of TALK NORMAL's energy and language. So far.
Blues Control
Blues Control
Amen Dunes
Amen Dunes
Amen Dunes' album was recorded under solitary conditions at a ramshackle cabin out in the Catskill Mountains (oh right, another one...), but unlike Bon Iver's For Emma, Forever Ago, this album sounds very unlike the introspective loner endeavors of some heartbroken troubadour. In fact, Dia is more in line with the fuzzy, garage-verb of In The Red's roster or the early lo-fi output of Love As Laughter
Noveller
Noveller
Noveller is the solo electric guitar project of Austin-based composer and filmmaker Sarah Lipstate. Handling the guitar as her muse, Lipstate summons a sonic palette so rich as to challenge the listener to conceive of how it’s housed in a single instrument manipulated by a solitary performer. Her one-woman guitar soundscapes have captured the attention of NPR, The Village Voice, Time Out New York, and The Wall Street Journal.

She released her first two full-length albums on Brooklyn noise label No Fun Productions in 2009. In 2010, Lipstate started her own imprint, Saffron Recordings, as a vehicle for releasing the Noveller full-length ‘Desert Fires’ and a split LP between Noveller and unFact (David Wm. Sims of the Jesus Lizard) titled ‘Bleached Valentine’. In May 2011, she released the critically acclaimed ‘Glacial Glow’ jointly through Saffron Recordings and Weird Forest. Her newest full-length, ‘No Dreams’, came out on October 22nd, 2013 on Important Records.

Lipstate’s festival performances include the Suoni Per Il Popolo fest in Montreal, No Fun Fest in NYC and Sweden, Decibel Festival in Seattle, Ellnora Festival in Illinois, New York Guitar Festival, Ecstatic Music Festival, Kilbi Im Exil in Zurich, and Unsound in Krakow. Noveller has toured the U.S. and internationally, at times supporting acts such as St. Vincent, Xiu Xiu, the Jesus Lizard, U.S. Girls, Aidan Baker, and Emeralds. Lipstate has collaborated with several renowned musicians, including live improvised duo performances with Carla Bozulich (Evangelista, The Geraldine Fibbers), David Wm. Sims (the Jesus Lizard, Scratch Acid), and Lee Ranaldo (Sonic Youth). She has previously performed as a member of Cold Cave, Parts & Labor, and One Umbrella. Lipstate has also participated in Rhys Chatham’s Guitar Army, Ben Frost’s “Music for 6 Guitars” Ensemble, and Glenn Branca’s 100 guitar ensemble. Lipstate joined the hit podcast Radiolab on a nationwide tour of their live show, Apocalyptical, performing a live cinematic score for their show along with fellow musicians Glenn Kotche (of Wilco) on percussion and Darin Gray on upright bass.