Opening Art Reception for Serious Whimsey: A Collection of Inevitable Objects

Opening Art Reception for Serious Whimsey: A Collection of Inevitable Objects

Gail Rothschild, Justin Gignac, Kit Warren, Lisanne McTernan, Mark DiBattista, Stephanie Homa, Sztuka Fabryka

Sun, December 5, 2010

6:00 pm

Free

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Opening Art Reception for Serious Whimsey: A Collection of Inevitable Objects
Opening Art Reception for Serious Whimsey: A Collection of Inevitable Objects
Littlefield and Cat Weaver are proud to present:

Serious Whimsy: a collection of inevitable objects

The artists in this show are driven --these objects are the inevitable manifestation of their unique, often obsessive drives.

Exhibit runs through December 30, 2010.
Gail Rothschild
A rock climber, Gail's work displays her sense of intimacy with muscle and rock, her interdependence with the earth and fellow climbers, and her fierce rule of space.
Justin Gignac
An entrepreneur in a world of whimsy, Justin's command of your litter, both literal and mental will not fail to put a furrow in your brow.
Kit Warren
Kit tinkers with tiny biomorphs, taking her ques from bacteria and ancient iconography. Her works on wood and paper take long hours of minute, concentrated energy, and that energy vibrates along every tiny etching.
Lisanne McTernan
Lisanne has always worked with a sense of urgency and a secret joy. One of the few contemporary artists that still display gesture while mixing abstract and figurative iconography, she has, in her latest work, taken to a kind of meditative repetition of mechanical process. Her scattered paper cut outs on sumi ink are a surprising twist on expressionist methods.
Mark DiBattista
Mark says he "can't draw," yet his dot by dot pencil sketches of small intricate objects are mind-bending in their specificity. We'll let you test your perspicacity with his Walnut Portrait Game!
Stephanie Homa
Stephanie likes to turn dichotomies into daring one-off jokes and disarming images. Lately she's created some fantastically fun masks.
Sztuka Fabryka
Sztuka Fabryka make objects that grow out of the past and plant themselves in the now.