Kris Allen, Teitur

Kris Allen

Teitur

Jillette Johnson

Sun, January 13, 2013

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 7:30 pm

$10.00 - $12.00

This event is 21 and over

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Kris Allen - (Set time: 10:00 PM)
Kris Allen
Since skyrocketing to stardom as the winner of the 2009 season of American Idol, Kris Allen has enjoyed success with 5 singles on the Billboard Charts. His self-titled debut album for 19 Recordings/Jive features his hit single "Live Like We're Dying" which has a combined digital sales of over 1.7 million. Since the release of his album he has toured with Keith Urban, Maroon 5, Barenaked Ladies, Lifehouse as well as headlining his own club tour. He is currently in the studio recording his sophomore album.
Teitur - (Set time: 8:30 PM)
Teitur
Look out, the musician’s favourite singer-songwriter is coming to a place near you with a new album. Says KT Tunstall: “he is the sound of melting ice, haunted woods and beautiful honesty” He is Teitur (Tie-tor), a man from the Faroe Islands who turns music into magic beautifully and effortlessly.

In 2002, Teitur was signed by the legendary Doug Morris to Universal Records in the US and in 2003, Teitur released his first album, Poetry & Aeroplanes. Its simple, sincere songs made it a critical hit. He toured the USA and Canada extensively, performed on American chat shows, watched as his songs got snapped up for film soundtracks (My Super Ex-Girlfriend and Aquamarine), and attracted the attention of respected singer-songwriters like Rufus Wainwright, Aimee Mann, KT Tunstall, Ron Sexsmith and John Mayer, all of whom took him on tour. John Mayer said of the album in Esquire Magazine: “...it may be one of the best albums to come around in the last five years...”. Minor radio hits in the US followed, but a real fanbase developed and the album became a cult hit, and rave reviews for gigs helped grow the story. During this time, he managed to co-write a song on the 4 million selling debut album by Corinne Bailey Rae.
In 2006, unhappy with the label's plans for his future, Teitur’s manager broke the contract and he left Universal. His manager then started his own label just for Teitur, and called it Arlo and Betty Recordings (after his 2 classic Gibson guitars). He released his second album Stay Under The Stars in the same year, a record full of richer writing and bolder characters, which went Gold in Denmark, spawning the huge radio hit, Louis Louis, and established him as a major star in Scandinavia and built his reputation across Continental Europe, with main stage appearances at Roskilde (opening the Festival with Radiohead in 2008), Benicassim, etc. Two Danish Grammies followed. By 2008, he had completed 700 gigs in 20 countries in 4 years, which earned him the reputation of one of the hardest working artists on the road.

In 2007, Teitur fulfilled a lifetime ambition by releasing an album in his mother tongue, Kata Hornid, before beginning work in late that year on The Singer, recorded in a Swedish Princesses house in Gotland, released in 2008 in Europe and early 2009 in the UK, his first album to be issued in Britain.

The Singer garnered five star reviews in The Guardian ("deep, viscous stuff that is never less than extraordinary") and The Independent ("a rare beast"), while the Sunday Times praised the singer-songwriter's " wonderfully idiosyncratic talent".

The Singer Included The Girl I Don't Know, with its swaggering Spaghetti Western guitars and dark, mournful horns; and the jaunty Catherine The Waitress, which Radio 2's Mark Radcliffe and Stuart Maconie liked so much they invited Teitur in for a session, helping his reputation grow, and pointing fans towards his series of successful shows across Britain.

Then in October 2009, the UK only release album 'All My Mistakes', a kind of “introduction to/best of” took us through the last seven years of Teitur's glittering career and revealed the marvellous jewels from his back catalogue. Achieving his second Album of The Week in The Independent, Andy Gill wrote of the album: “...there's more than enough evidence here to bear out Teitur's assertion, in the title-track, that "all my mistakes have become masterpieces."

Teitur continued his career development in many ways, producing and writing for a major French artist, Nolwenn; co-writing and performing with American Contemporary film musician Nico Muhly (who scored the film The Reader), writing for other artists and all the time continued writing songs for his next album.

During 2010, Teitur recorded his stunning new album Let the Dog drive home in Denmark and mixed it in Norway, an album which combines the quality of songs from his first album, with the broad appeal of his second, and some of the coolness of the third, The Singer.

In the meantime, Seal heard Teitur’s song “You Get Me” and recorded it for his new album, which has recently been released, going top 20 around the world.

Teitur’s new album Let The Dog drive home is out in most of Continental Europe (already top 10 in Denmark and charted in Holland) and South Korea preceded in the UK by the single, “Betty Hedges”, and “You never leave L.A.” in Europe.

“You never leave L.A.” is scheduled as the first single in the US and the rest of the world in advance of the release, combined with an astounding animated video which took 6 months to make and a US tour planned for February to March 2012.

Reviews for the album include:
The Independent: 4/5: "...Teitur's fifth collection of songs soon winds itself inexorably round one's heart, its emotional tendrils taking purchase like clematis scaling a garden wall."
Scottish Sunday Express 4*: "...an album full of simple yet deceptively deep songs" The Fly : 4/5: "Music to hold dear"
MusicOMH: "Understated, and close to perfection..."
Jillette Johnson - (Set time: 7:30 PM)
Jillette Johnson
On August 14th singer-songwriter Jillette Johnson releases the smoldering and passionate debut EP Whiskey & Frosting (Wind-up Records). It’s an intimate and boldly emotional five-song collection of stately pop from a unique and unflinchingly honest artist. Johnson’s commitment to her distinct vision is thorough and uncompromising, from her willingness to explore the raw and controversial in her ly
rics, to her unwillingness to give into tempting hot ticket-career opportunities. Johnson audaciously declined a high-exposure spot on the television talent show The Voice to keep her creative autonomy.

“I realized those paths would be inauthentic to me. I know how to write my own music, and I want a say in my career,” Johnson explains.

Whiskey & Frosting is one of those rare and revelatory debuts where you experience a young songwriter with a highly mature sense of artistic self. The NYC-based singer-piano player wrote all the songs on the EP, and her upcoming album. The piano-based songs unfold with honeyed drama and grandeur, showcasing Johnson’s soaring vocals which manage to both be comforting and spiritually rousing.

“Two of my favorite things are whiskey and frosting,” Johnson says laughing. “The title came directly from an impromptu birthday party with friends where I ate the frosting off cupcakes and drank whiskey. I was telling my producers about the night when I realized how similar those two things were to my writing style. I don’t write happy songs without some melancholy feelings in there. I like to paint an entire emotional picture. There is depth, sorrow, and overly sweet tones. Many of the songs are about living as a young person in New York City, living irresponsibly and exploring consequences.”

The bravely vulnerable “Cameron” explores the struggle of a transgendered person and transpires a universal anthem for staying true to oneself. Johnson sings: Cameron's in drag, makes his father mad / Since he was a little boy / He always felt more comfortable in lipstick / These days the world is full of aliens / The world is full of aliens, but you are a human / You're not an alien / You are a real live human / Aren't you, Cameron? At its fundamental core, “Cameron” is about making tough choices to be authentic; a definite thematic thread in Johnson’s life.
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“I didn’t know I was going to write about a transgendered boy, the words just came out and I thought, ‘Oh, this is about someone trying be someone they don’t appear to be,’” she reveals. “There is a sensation I get when I want to create. I have energy coursing through my veins, and I just let my hands fall and run with it. I don’t always know the initial reference point, but then I go back and make sense of what I’m saying. It’s pure subconscious inspiration and relentless editing. ‘Cameron’ ended up being inspired by a transgendered kid I’m close with, but the song also captures the need to feel at home in your own skin.”

Jillette Johnson got signed to Wind-up on the strength of “Cameron.” “That song was a turning point. Talent makes people notice you, but songs bring people to action,” she figures. Inking a deal was the culmination of many years of steadfast pursuit of her ideals and her dream to be a professional musician. “I was convinced by the age of 4 I was going to be a rock star,” she says with a smile. At 6 Johnson began taking piano lessons, and by 8 she was writing her own songs. Her formative influences were the Les Misérables Soundtrack and artists such as Joni Mitchell, Bruce Springsteen, Billy Joel, Carole King, and Sarah McLachlan. “I learned song structure from those beautifully articulate songwriters. Joni said so much with quirky lyrics, Carole had a way of simplifying—those two parallels formed me as a lyricist.”

At 18 she left her small town of Pound Ridge, New York, population 4,000, to move to NYC’s vibrantly creative Loho neighborhood. From 12-18 she had been making migratory visits to soak up the city’s buzzing inspiration, but her move cemented a creative relationship between her youth, the city, and her soulful compositions.

The EP also features highlights like the elegant and stirring “When The Ship Goes Down,” and the buoyant and heartfelt “Torpedo.” “Pauvre Coeur” juxtaposes gorgeously spare classical-flavored piano against bluntly confessional lyrics about a dried up romantic relationship. It’s one of the most arresting moments on the EP. Here Johnson sings: If I recall it was a Friday / Gentle hum before the war / You were high and watching poker / And I had just walked in the door / You started screaming at the TV / Saying, make a play you filthy whore / And I was trying to make you see me / Like the way you did before.

“I wrote that from a perspective of strength. I haven’t been in a lot of relationships—the longest has been my music career. Music comes first, anything that got in the way suffered. This was about my first serious adult relationship. It became emotionally abusive as it reached the end, and I lost myself. When I rediscovered myself, I found the strength to leave,” she reveals.

The EP and the upcoming album, were produced by Peter Zizzo, widely respected for developing Vanessa Carlton and Avril Lavigne, and Michael Mangini, esteemed for his work with Joss Stone, Bruce Hornsby, and David Byrne. The duo’s innate understanding of Johnson’s singular vision, and respect for her fully-formed compositions helped them enhance the power and dynamics of the music. “They maintained the spirit of the songs—they still are a 100% my songs—they’re just turned way up on the amp,” she says.

Reflectively, Jillette Johnson says: “I have a specific point of view and I follow my instincts. My sensibility has been in tune with my emotions. I’m always honest with what I feel. I’m passionate with my songs to a fault.”